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Disability Issues/Assistance

    Results: 23

  • Assistive Technology Equipment (17)
    LH-0600

    Assistive Technology Equipment

    LH-0600

    Programs that pay for or provide equipment, appliances and assistive aids that enable people, including those who have physical or sensory limitations, to increase their mobility and/or ability to communicate and live more comfortably.
  • Brain Disorders (2)
    YF-3000.1300

    Brain Disorders

    YF-3000.1300

    Any of a variety of conditions that are characterized by significant impairment of brain tissue and resultant loss of brain function including degenerative illnesses (e.g., Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, stroke and other cerebrovascular accidents), genetic variations or mutations that affect the development and functioning of the brain either in utero or following birth, traumatic brain injury, post infection damage, brain tumors, and permanent damage that occurs as a result of seizures, substance toxicity or other disorders as well as conditions affecting the brain that are present prior to birth.
  • Brain Injury Rehabilitation (1)
    LR-1570.2000

    Brain Injury Rehabilitation

    LR-1570.2000

    Rehabilitation programs that develop an individually tailored treatment plan that combines the resources of physical, occupational and speech/language therapists; physiatrists (physical medicine specialists); neuropsychologists/psychiatrists; cognitive rehabilitation therapists; rehabilitation nurses; vocational counselors; social workers and/or other specialists to help individuals who have been disabled by an acquired brain injury attain their maximum level of functioning and quality of life. Common disabilities experienced by ABI patients following acute treatment and medical stabilization include problems with cognition (thinking, memory, and reasoning), sensory processing (sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell), communication (expression and understanding), and behavior or mental health (depression, anxiety, personality changes, aggression, acting out, and social inappropriateness). Therapy generally focuses on behavioral management, neuropsychological adaptation, environmental structuring, eating and swallowing management, cognitive and communication skills, daily living and social skills, self-care, ambulation, academic and vocational skills, and community reintegration. The goal of brain injury rehabilitation is to restore functions and skills that can be recovered and to help patients learn to do things differently when functioning cannot be restored to pre-injury levels.
  • Centers for Independent Living (1)
    LR-1550

    Centers for Independent Living

    LR-1550

    Consumer controlled, community based, cross disability, nonresidential agencies designed and operated within a local community by individuals with disabilities that provide an array of independent living services. All CILs provide five core services: information and referral, independent living skills training, peer counseling, individual and systems advocacy and transition. In addition, many CILs also offer transportation services, mobility training, personal assistance, housing and home modifications, recreation services, vocational programs, assistance in obtaining assistive technology equipment and other individualized services designed to increase and maintain independence.
  • Developmental Assessment (1)
    LF-7000.1700

    Developmental Assessment

    LF-7000.1700

    Programs that provide a comprehensive, structured evaluation of a child's cognitive/intellectual functioning, language and communication skills, independent living skills, social and emotional development and perceptual/motor functioning in order to identify individuals who show developmental delays, determine the nature and extent of the problem and recommend a course of treatment and care. Developmental assessments are generally offered by a developmental assessment specialist, or a team of professionals that can include a pediatrician, language specialist, audiologist, occupational therapist, child psychologist and child psychiatrist, among others. They involve age-adjusted questions regarding a child's growth, physical movements, behavior, play, and interactions with family members and the rest of the world as well as a series of tests that may include a physical exam, hearing and eye screenings, play observation, and standardized tests that present the child with specific tasks to determine areas of strength and weakness. Developmental assessments are occasionally done for adults. They can also be used to identify individuals who have developmental disabilities such as intellectual disabilities, epilepsy, cerebral palsy, autism and neurological impairments, in order to establish eligibility for state and federally funded programs.
  • Developmental Disabilities Activity Centers (1)
    LR-3100.1800-130

    Developmental Disabilities Activity Centers

    LR-3100.1800-130

    Community-based day programs that provide social and recreational opportunities for adults with developmental disabilities who generally have acquired most basic self-care skills, have some ability to interact with others, are able to make their needs known and respond to instructions. The programs use social and recreational activities to help participants develop and maintain basic functional skills, though most will remain in the program on a long-term basis rather than transitioning to more independent settings.
  • Developmental Screening (1)
    LF-7000.1730

    Developmental Screening

    LF-7000.1730

    Programs that offer a procedure that is designed to identify children who should receive more intensive assessment or diagnosis for potential developmental delays. Screening tools can be specific to a disorder (e.g., autism), an area (e.g., cognitive development, language, or gross motor skills), or they may be general, encompassing multiple areas of concern; and rely heavily on parent observation. They do not provide conclusive evidence of developmental delays and do not result in diagnoses. A positive screening result should be followed by a thorough assessment. The goal of developmental screening is to allow for earlier detection of delays in order to improve child health and well-being for identified children.
  • Disability Associations (3)
    TN-1700

    Disability Associations

    TN-1700

    Organizations whose members are individuals who work in the disability field and have affiliated for the purpose of promoting mutual interests, participating in education and training conferences, interacting with other professionals and taking advantage of other opportunities for personal and professional development. Many disability associations also include individuals with disabilities and their families in their membership. Disability associations may also advocate for the rights of people with disabilities and their caregivers; promote legislation that funds research and services for this population; and provide information for members and the general public. Included are associations that focus on a specific disability such as autism or brain injuries; and those that address a broad range of disability issues.
  • Disability Related Transportation (2)
    BT-4500.6500-170

    Disability Related Transportation

    BT-4500.6500-170

    Programs that provide door-to-door (or curb-to-curb) transportation for purposes of shopping, banking, social events, medical appointments, getting to and from work, and similar activities for people with disabilities who need special accommodations and are unable to utilize other available means of transportation. Also included are programs that provide transportation for youngsters with disabilities who have no other means of accessing necessary specialized services and activities. Some but not all vehicles used for this purpose are equipped with wheelchair lifts.
  • Disease/Disability Information (2)
    LH-2700.1700

    Disease/Disability Information

    LH-2700.1700

    Programs that provide information about the causes and origins, preventive measures, symptoms, screening/diagnostic procedures, and/or methods of treatment or management including the latest research for specific illnesses or disabling conditions.
  • Early Intervention for Children With Disabilities/Delays (5)
    LR-1700

    Early Intervention for Children With Disabilities/Delays

    LR-1700

    Programs that identify infants, toddlers and in some cases, preschoolers who show evidence of or are at risk for lags in physical development, cognitive development, language and speech development, psychosocial development or self-help skills, and provide or coordinate the delivery of an enrichment program in order to minimize the potential for a developmental delay and to meet their current developmental needs. The program may include early identification activities (child find); a developmental evaluation; a review of family concerns, priorities and resources; meetings with the family to develop an individualized family service plan; service coordination to ensure that the individual and his or her family receive needed services which may include but are not limited to physical therapy, occupational therapy, audiology, health/medical services, nursing services, nutrition services, psychological services including specialized play groups or therapy sessions, counseling, speech and language assistance, special instructional services, transportation, and parenting skills development; and ongoing evaluation of the child's progress and his or her changing enrichment needs. Included are "birth to three" programs and federal, state or local programs that address the needs of slightly older children or children not otherwise eligible for "birth to three" programs.
  • Equestrian Therapy (2)
    RP-8000.1925

    Equestrian Therapy

    RP-8000.1925

    Programs that provide opportunities for individuals with any of a wide range of disabilities and others (e.g., victims of assault or abuse, people who have recently suffered a tragic loss, incarcerated offenders, at risk youth) to relate to, handle, groom and ride horses as a part of an experiential habilitation or therapy program in which the horse serves as a co-facilitator or co-therapist. Equestrian therapy provides an experience with horses that fosters growth, communication skills, self-esteem, self-awareness, healing and personal transformation. Clients learn about themselves and others by participating in activities with the horses, and then discussing feelings, behaviors and patterns. Therapy goals for different populations may differ, e.g., treatment for children with autism may focus on behavior modification and improvement.
  • Group Residences for Adults With Disabilities (1)
    BH-8400.6000-280

    Group Residences for Adults With Disabilities

    BH-8400.6000-280

    Agency-owned or operated facilities that provide an alternative living environment for adults with developmental disabilities, sensory impairments, physical disabilities, emotional disabilities, multiple disabilities or chronic illnesses such as AIDS who are in need of personal services, supervision and/or assistance essential for self-protection or sustaining the activities of daily living and consequently are unable to live with their own families or in a more independent setting. Group residences for adults with disabilities may be licensed by the state and may be distinguished according to the level of service residents require. Service levels depend on the self-care skills residents possess, their limitations in the areas of physical coordination and mobility, and the presence and extent of behavior problems including disruptive or self-injurious behavior.
  • Health/Disability Related Counseling (3)
    RP-1400.8000-300

    Health/Disability Related Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-300

    Programs that provide emotional support, information and guidance in a variety of settings for individuals who have a disability; who are concerned about or have any of a variety of illnesses, including those that may ultimately be fatal; or who have experienced the disabling or disfiguring effects of an illness, injury or surgery. The counseling may deal with the realities of having a disability or being ill, coping with their illness/disability, life adjustments required by their situation, and helping them evaluate their alternatives and make personal choices that will maximize their ability to function independently. Included are programs that provide counseling for individuals who have a family history of a particular health condition or disability and need assistance in coping with the emotional problems that are associated with having or being at risk for developing the condition.
  • Health/Disability Related Support Groups (1)
    PN-8100.3000

    Health/Disability Related Support Groups

    PN-8100.3000

    Mutual support groups whose members are people who have specific disabilities, illnesses or other health conditions, their families and friends. The groups meet in-person, by telephone or via the Internet; and provide an opportunity for participants to share information, resources, practical tips for daily living and encouragement about issues related to the disability or health problem.
  • Home/Community Based Developmental Disabilities Programs (2)
    LR-3100

    Home/Community Based Developmental Disabilities Programs

    LR-3100

    Programs for individuals with developmental disabilities that focus on enabling the individual to attain his or her maximum functional level and which may serve to reinforce skills or lessons taught in school, therapy or other settings. Services may be provided in the individual's home or outside the home in community-based settings.
  • In Home Developmental Disabilities Habilitation Programs (1)
    LR-3100.3300

    In Home Developmental Disabilities Habilitation Programs

    LR-3100.3300

    Programs that provide habilitation services whose goal is to help individuals with developmental disabilities who reside within the family home achieve maximum independence, integration, individualization and productivity in both home and community settings. Habilitation services include therapeutic activities, assistance, training, supervision and monitoring in the areas of self-care, sensory and motor development, interpersonal skills, communication, socialization, health care, leisure and recreation, money management, household chores and other self-help, socialization and adaptive skills necessary to reside successfully in the community.
  • Independent Living Skills Instruction (1)
    LR-3200

    Independent Living Skills Instruction

    LR-3200

    Programs that assist people who have disabilities to learn the basic skills of daily living through individual and group counseling and instruction, experience and practice in coping with real or simulated life situational demands; or through the use of assistive devices, special equipment and specialized assistants. Services include but are not limited to training in the ability to travel about the community alone; to live independently in a private residence; to maintain health through self-care and use of medical services; to live within personal income; to maintain acceptable grooming and appearance; to deal with legal, family or social problems; and to cope with other requirements for successful independent living.
  • Protection and Advocacy for Individuals With Disabilities (2)
    FT-1000.6600

    Protection and Advocacy for Individuals With Disabilities

    FT-1000.6600

    Programs that provide assistance for individuals with disabilities who are having difficulty understanding and/or obtaining the full benefits and services to which they are entitled by law. Included are federally mandated programs that are part of the formal protection and advocacy system which includes Protection and Advocacy for Persons with Developmental Disabilities (PADD), Protection and Advocacy for Individuals with Mental Illness (PAIMI), Protection and Advocacy for Individual Rights (PAIR) and the Client Assistance Program (CAP); and independent organizations that provide the same types of services. Protection and advocacy programs provide legal representation and other advocacy services, under federal and state laws, for all people with disabilities and endeavor to ensure full access to inclusive educational programs, financial entitlements, health care, accessible housing and productive employment opportunities. The programs maintain a presence in facilities that care for people with disabilities where they monitor, investigate and attempt to remedy adverse conditions. CAP agencies (many of which are housed within protection and advocacy offices) provide information and assistance for individuals seeking or receiving vocational rehabilitation services under the Rehabilitation Act, including assistance in pursuing administrative, legal and other appropriate remedies.
  • Service Animals (1)
    LR-7950

    Service Animals

    LR-7950

    Programs that provide and train recipients in the use of animals who have been taught to help individuals who have disabilities increase their mobility and independence and/or maximize their ability to communicate effectively.
  • Special Education for Learning Disabilities (1)
    HH-8000 * YF-4500

    Special Education for Learning Disabilities

    HH-8000 * YF-4500

    Programs that provide educational services including special placement and individualized programming, instruction and/or support services for exceptional children, youth and/or adults, including those who have hearing impairments, visual impairments, physical disabilities, learning disabilities, mental retardation and/or other developmental disabilities, emotional disturbance, multiple disabilities or speech or language impairments and who need appropriately modified curricula, teaching methodologies and instructional materials in order to learn. Services may include the development, in partnership with the child's parents, of an individualized educational plan to meet the child's needs and the implementation and review at least annually of each child's plan to determine progress and future needs.

    A neurological disorder that affects one or more of the basic psychological processes involved in understanding or in using spoken or written language. The disability may manifest itself in an imperfect ability to listen, think, speak, read, write, spell or to do mathematical calculations. Learning disabilities should not be confused with learning problems which are primarily the result of visual, hearing, or motor handicaps; of mental retardation; of emotional disturbance; or of environmental, cultural or economic disadvantages.

  • Special Education Plan Development (1)
    HH-8000.8100

    Special Education Plan Development

    HH-8000.8100

    Programs that provide information, technical assistance and support which relates to the development, implementation, review and revision of Individual Education Programs (IEPs) for students with disabilities and/or Individual Family Service Plans (IFSPs) for infants and toddlers with disabilities who are eligible for early intervention services. IEPs are written documents developed by a team that includes a child’s parents and school staff which lists, among other things, the special education services (including transition services) the child will receive. IFSPs document family involvement and early intervention services provided to infants and toddlers with disabilities. The programs may target special education professionals and or parents; and help parents participate more effectively in the process.
  • Veteran Compensation and Pension Benefits (3)
    NS-1800.9000

    Veteran Compensation and Pension Benefits

    NS-1800.9000

    Programs administered by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs that provide monthly payments to veterans who are disabled and were discharged under other than dishonorable conditions, their dependent children, surviving spouses and parents. Included are compensation benefits for veterans with service-connected disabilities; and pension benefits for veterans with limited incomes who are age 65 or older or are permanently and totally disabled as a result of a condition not related to military service. Veterans who are more seriously disabled may qualify for Aid and Attendance or Housebound benefits which are paid in addition to the basic compensation or pension rate. A veteran cannot receive both Aid and Attendance and Housebound benefits at the same time.